The Debate Surrounding Confederate Monuments

August 28, 2017

Dr. Jill Titus, Associate Director, Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College and the author of Brown’s Battleground suggests that we often misunderstand historical monuments, thinking they are “history” when they are really interpretations of history. As such, they become opportunities for conversation, study, communication and reflection. When deciding the fate of such monuments, context is critical. The New Orleans monument was clearly offensive, but many others should be retained as markers of our self-understanding as Americans.

The producers would like to note that this episode was recorded on July 7th 2017, a month before the tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia surrounding the Robert E. Lee statue and related protests and counter protests. 

United Lutheran Seminary expresses deepest sympathy for the those killed and injured in Charlottesville.  Please take a moment to read the written response to the events in Charlottesville. 

We also encourage our listeners to revisit the episode titled “Not waiting for the Hero” to hear an example of a unique form of non-violent counter protest that was carried out 10 years ago under similar circumstances. 

 

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Refugees and Migrants: The Duty to Welcome

August 14, 2017

Lou Charest, Manager for University Engagement for Catholic Relief Services, describes the current global refugee crisis and explains why Catholic social teaching, as well as Pope Francis, calls us to welcome migrants and refugees. He offers suggestions for how local communities can provide support, from encouraging legislation to linking with refugee families.

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The Top Layer of the Fold of History is Now

July 31, 2017

Gettysburg National Military Park Artist-in-Residence Brian Emery joins Katy Giebenhain from Seminary Ridge Review in a conversation about his “experimental documentary” adventures on and around the Gettysburg National Military Park. The FIT photography professor shares from his experiences as an introvert in public spaces capturing voices (including the voices of birds) images and stories from past and current history.

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Here We Stand: Responding to a History of Oppression in S.W. Africa and Congo

July 18, 2017

Dr. Maria Erling, Professor of American Church History, ULS, and author, “The Augustana Story” sets the Lutheran World Federation Assembly, held in Windhoek, Namibia in the context of justice and reconciliation in Namibia and the abused women in the Congo.

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Pittsburgh and Paris: Why Are Persons of Color Attracted to the City of Light?

July 3, 2017

Dr. Nelson Strobert, Professor Emeritus of Christian Education, Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary, and author, Daniel Alexander Payne, distinguishes between a tourist and a traveler, and cites three travelers of color who journeyed to Paris to round out their education, and discovered “liberty, equality, and fraternity” as they had not in America.

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Not Waiting for the Hero

June 19, 2017

Award-winning songwriter, performer, author and peace activist David LaMotte has travelled extensively. In Gettysburg for the first time, he talks with Katy Giebenhain from Seminary Ridge Review about change narratives, reconciliation and a wonderfully unexpected story of nonviolent response.

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All that Jazz!

May 22, 2017

This episode centers on the ministry of Pastor Dale Lind who has been pastor to the Jazz community at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, a restauranteur and bartender. He was selected for the Gettysburg Seminary 2017 Alumni Award in Specialized Ministry. He shares how he developed his interest in bar ministry, jazz ministry and became the owner of a popular eatery in New York City. In these experiences in specialized ministry, he encountered many luminaries in jazz and popular music.

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Not Charity, but a Chance

March 27, 2017

Dr. David Crowner, Professor Emeritus, Gettysburg College and Co-Chair, Project Gettysburg-Leon, describes how charitable organizations can avoid simple charity, if this means patronizing those they serve, and making them dependent; and instead aim for sustainable development. In other words, they help people help themselves. Project Gettysburg-Leon has established eight criteria for this process. Most import is the need to listen and build partnerships.

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Urban Ministry, Black Men, and the Lutheran Church

March 13, 2017

Pastor Yehiel Curry of Shekinah Chapel describes his own path to ordained ministry, and his work with the Lutheran Church in developing a relevant, exciting ministry, geared toward Black men and their families in Chicago. He is dynamic, passionate and wise, and you will love his story!

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Taking the Long View: Artist Nick Collier and the Raw Charms of a Gettysburg Winter

February 8, 2017

Nick Collier, the current Gettysburg National Military Park Artist-in-Residence, speaks with Katy Giebenhain about sculpture, a contemporary twist on an Afghan Box Camera and what it is like to be a veteran spending a month on the iconic Battlefield outside of tourist season.

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