Common Sense in the Gun Debate

April 9, 2018

Judy and David Young from Gettysburg for Gunsense share the efforts being made by this group to promote common sense gun legislation and responsible gun ownership. Learn how things have changed since the tragedy in Parkland, Florida and what the group’s hopes are for the future.

Fro More information email: gettysburg4gunsense@gmail.com

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Access to Medicines and Overcoming the Barriers

March 26, 2018

In a conversation with Fran Quigley the Seminary Explores learns of some deeply-held misconceptions we have about drug costs, the urgency for change, and how people of faith might fit in. Quigley is Clinical Professor and Director of the Health and Human Rights Clinic at Indiana University McKinney School of Law. He is the author of four books: Prescription for the People: An Activist’s Guide to Making Medicine Affordable for All, If We Can Win Here, How Human Rights Can Build Haiti, and Walking Together, Walking Far.

 

People of Faith for Access to Medicines

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One Journey to the United States: An Immigrant Story

March 12, 2018

Justine Odila talks about his journey from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the United States. While in the Congo, he worked to help child soldiers to return to school, their families and mental stability as well as helping other young children to not become soldiers in the first place. This work resulted in him being arrested but he escaped to Zambia where he lived in a refugee camp for 17 years where he carried assisting those around him. After a 5-year vetting process, he was finally able to come to the United States via a resettlement program. He presently works at Walmart, works part-time as a mental health counselor, and attends classes at the community college.

 

To learn more about the Democratic Republic of the Congo you can begin here:

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/cg.html

https://www.hrw.org/africa/democratic-republic-congo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Republic_of_the_Congo

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From the Desert to the Peach Orchard

February 26, 2018

During her residency, Tucson-based writer Julie Swarstad Johnson will be working on poems inspired by stories of pacifist faith communities around Gettysburg before, during and after the time of the battle, with a particular focus on the experiences of the Sherfy family (owners of the Peach Orchard). Her own practice as a member of Mennonite and Quaker congregations will add perspective to the historical role these communities. It is an opportunity to understand examples of pacifism and faith in American public life. She took time from her research, writing and explorations for a conversation with Katy Giebenhain about her project. The author of Jumping the Pit by Finishing Line Press, Swarstad Johnson is a Library Specialist at the University of Arizona Poetry Center.

Julie Swarstad Johnson will give a free public poetry reading March 3rd at the Gettysburg NMP Museum and Visitor Center at 3:00 p.m.
The event is sponsored by a grant from the Gettysburg Foundation and other generous sponsors. For more information about the event call 717-334-1124.

Thanks to our host site for this interview, Waldo’s and Co. on the square in Gettysburg.

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The Healing Power of Art

February 12, 2018

Artist Joshua Osburg, MFA Candidate at FontBonne University, Artist in Residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park, and combat veteran explores the importance of art to him throughout his life. He explores the idea that art can serve as a method to eliminate stress and how art can be a vehicle for personal healing.

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Building Community Around Sourdough Bread

January 29, 2018

Mark Jalbert, Director of Bakewell Farm, shares his love of bread and explores ways that Bakewell Farm is using bread to build community. From the science of fermentation to sharing a loaf with a neighbor or those in need. You can almost smell the loaves come out of the oven.

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On-Site Immediacy and the Continuing Role of Combat Artists

January 15, 2018

Chip Beck is not only a veteran and an artist, he is also a combat artist with global experience who has rendered these experiences first-hand. His academic training is in political science, but he has been capturing what he sees on paper and other surfaces since he was a small child. Beck is an artist-in-residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park. He joins Katy Giebenhain for a conversation about “stone soldiers” and his current time on Gettysburg’s battlefield.

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Signs of Safety

January 1, 2018

Social-justice poet Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo is the first “Poets in the Park” artist-in-residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park. She stopped by the Gettysburg campus of United Lutheran Seminary for a conversation about her evolving collection, her experience as a desert aid worker on the U.S.-Mexico border, hobo markings, Tarot card prompts and more.

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A Year in the Woods

December 19, 2017

Dylan Miller spent his last year of college living in a hut he built himself in the middle of the woods. While it was part of his capstone project on living a minimalist life it was truely much more than an "assignment."  Dylan discusses his approach to life, what led him to this project and where he is going from here in this truely unique perspective on living an examined life.

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Gerrymandering: How to Skew Election Results Without Hardly Trying

December 4, 2017

Often one party receives more votes for congress or the legislature and ends up with fewer representatives. The reason is “gerrymandering”: shaping voting districts to favor one party or the other. Steven Niebler, Coordinator, Fair Districts, Adams County, a Sub-group of Fair Districts, Pennsylvania,  argues that the key to this unbalance is that elected officials choose their own voters. “Fair Districts,” a non-partisan advocacy group, proposes an eleven-member commission, chosen partly at random and partly by serious vetting, to set impartial boundaries.

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