The Seminary Explores
Restoring Health in the World, One Disease at a Time

Restoring Health in the World, One Disease at a Time

May 6, 2019

Kate Braband, Senior Associate Director of Program Development, Carter Center, Atlanta, Georgia describes the success that the Carter Center, initiated thirty years ago by President and Mrs. Jimmy Carter, has had in controlling guinea worm, one of the more painful and debilitating of the Neglected Tropical Diseases (WTD) in Central Africa. Not long ago, cases numbered in the thousands; today in the twenties. Guinea worm is controlled, not by vaccinations, but by changes in behavior, especially drinking filtered water. Education and supervision are largely in the hands of the locals. Other projects by the Carter Center derive from their mission of building hope, restoring health, and fighting for peace. To achieve these goals, the Center enlists national governments, the United Nations, and international corporations.

Suicide, a National Tragedy

Suicide, a National Tragedy

June 18, 2018

Dr. Margaret Swartz, Clinical Psychologist, Yorland Psychological Associates, York, PA, presents the tragic extent of suicides in America, especially among white males who own guns. She describes the characteristics of potential suicides, including low self-image, depression, and anger. Among the actions needed, she stresses the importance of addressing the issue openly with those who appear to have the tendency, followed by professional therapy. 

National hotline: 800-273-TALK (8255)

Senior Citizen Living: Issues, Concerns, and Possibilities

Senior Citizen Living: Issues, Concerns, and Possibilities

May 7, 2018

Angela Dohrman, Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, SpiriTrust Lutheran, discussed providing quality care for senior citizens. The discussion included: definitions of senior care, the difficulties in sustaining quality care, the recruitment of personnel, Affordable Health Care act, regulations for senior care facilities, the calling or vocation of SpiriTrust personnel. 

Access to Medicines and Overcoming the Barriers

Access to Medicines and Overcoming the Barriers

March 26, 2018

In a conversation with Fran Quigley the Seminary Explores learns of some deeply-held misconceptions we have about drug costs, the urgency for change, and how people of faith might fit in. Quigley is Clinical Professor and Director of the Health and Human Rights Clinic at Indiana University McKinney School of Law. He is the author of four books: Prescription for the People: An Activist’s Guide to Making Medicine Affordable for All, If We Can Win Here, How Human Rights Can Build Haiti, and Walking Together, Walking Far.

 

People of Faith for Access to Medicines

Examining A Summer with Healthcare

Examining A Summer with Healthcare

October 9, 2017

Clay Pasqual, a college senior, spent the summer as intern for the Fund for American Studies in the Institute for Business and Governmental Affairs. The focus of his work dealt with healthcare issues in the United States. The internship included:

  • Attending congressional hearings
  • Working on Press Releases and Community Materials
  • Attending and participating in a seminar
  • Expanding healthcare to include issues beyond medicinal and hospitalization, i.e. socio-economic
Why a National Health Program Makes Sense to a Family Physician

Why a National Health Program Makes Sense to a Family Physician

September 25, 2017

Dr. Dwight Michael, physician in family practice with Gettysburg Family Practice and member of Physicians for a National Health Program and Health Care for All Pennsylvania, believes that healthcare is a human right, recognized as such by every modern industrialized nation except the United States. Opponents have not considered the savings that a single-payer system would bring to the economy; on the contrary, he asserts, the cost of not adopting universal health care will be counted in the trillions by 2020.

Please note this discussion was recorded on July 7, 2017, references to specific bills in Congress should understood in this context.

Cancer Trials and Christian Faith:  One Expression of a Lutheran Vocation

Cancer Trials and Christian Faith: One Expression of a Lutheran Vocation

September 26, 2016

In the ongoing series of podcasts “Science for Seminaries”, Gettysburg Seminary board member Dr. Greg Yothers discusses his own faith and the connection he sees between his faith and his work as a researcher in clinical cancer trials. 

Is the Private Practice Physician a Dinosaur?

Is the Private Practice Physician a Dinosaur?

July 11, 2016

Recorded live at St. James Lutheran Church in Gettysburg, long time host, Dr. Gerald Christianson, talks with Dr. Elizabeth Wood, retired physician in private practice, about the decline of private practice in medicine.  Dr. Wood expresses concern that some important values are in danger of being lost: a single physician’s knowledge of the whole person; drug over-dose or contradicting prescriptions; lack of communication among specialists.  Much has been gained as well, but two universal issues remain open to debate: the delivery of quality care for all and end of life decisions.

Genetics, Immunology and Microscopic Worms:  The Natural Curiosity of a Scientist

Genetics, Immunology and Microscopic Worms: The Natural Curiosity of a Scientist

March 14, 2016

In this episode, a part of our ongoing series about Science for Seminaries, geneticist Dr. Jennifer Powell describes her work and the importance of genetics for understanding life.

What’s the Future of Health Care in America?

What’s the Future of Health Care in America?

June 22, 2015

Will Lane, Director of the Writing Center, Gettysburg College and former Chair, Adams-Hanover Health Care for All discusses the current status of healthcare in America with host Dr. Christianson.  Mr. Lane says the health care is slowly improving under The Affordable Care Act, but the goal is still to cover everyone with affordable health care. The obstacles today are political and not value or workable solutions.   Two models to meet the goal are regulated private companies and the expansion of Medicare for everyone.