Flight from Oppression

May 21, 2018

In the second of two interviews (the first on immigrating to the United States), Odila describes the circumstances of his arrest, imprisonment, brutalizing, and eventual escape. He was apprehended while working with the Red Cross in the Republic of Congo because he opposed the use of children as soldiers in Congo’s civil war, some as young as seven or eight. He continued his counseling during the 17 years he lived in an immigration camp in Zambia.

Recorded live on Sunday, May 6, at St. James Lutheran Church, Gettysburg.

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One Journey to the United States: An Immigrant Story

March 12, 2018

Justine Odila talks about his journey from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the United States. While in the Congo, he worked to help child soldiers to return to school, their families and mental stability as well as helping other young children to not become soldiers in the first place. This work resulted in him being arrested but he escaped to Zambia where he lived in a refugee camp for 17 years where he carried assisting those around him. After a 5-year vetting process, he was finally able to come to the United States via a resettlement program. He presently works at Walmart, works part-time as a mental health counselor, and attends classes at the community college.

 

To learn more about the Democratic Republic of the Congo you can begin here:

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/cg.html

https://www.hrw.org/africa/democratic-republic-congo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Republic_of_the_Congo

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The Healing Power of Art

February 12, 2018

Artist Joshua Osburg, MFA Candidate at FontBonne University, Artist in Residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park, and combat veteran explores the importance of art to him throughout his life. He explores the idea that art can serve as a method to eliminate stress and how art can be a vehicle for personal healing.

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On-Site Immediacy and the Continuing Role of Combat Artists

January 15, 2018

Chip Beck is not only a veteran and an artist, he is also a combat artist with global experience who has rendered these experiences first-hand. His academic training is in political science, but he has been capturing what he sees on paper and other surfaces since he was a small child. Beck is an artist-in-residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park. He joins Katy Giebenhain for a conversation about “stone soldiers” and his current time on Gettysburg’s battlefield.

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Capturing the Colors

October 23, 2017

Texas-based graphic designer Cesar Rivera joins Katy Giebenhain from Seminary Ridge Review for a conversation about the Pickett’s Charge flag capture of Corporal Joseph De Castro, artifact books, working as much color theory as possible into classes and ways in which all designers are educators. Rivera was an artist-in-residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park.

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The Debate Surrounding Confederate Monuments

August 28, 2017

Dr. Jill Titus, Associate Director, Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College and the author of Brown’s Battleground suggests that we often misunderstand historical monuments, thinking they are “history” when they are really interpretations of history. As such, they become opportunities for conversation, study, communication and reflection. When deciding the fate of such monuments, context is critical. The New Orleans monument was clearly offensive, but many others should be retained as markers of our self-understanding as Americans.

The producers would like to note that this episode was recorded on July 7th 2017, a month before the tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia surrounding the Robert E. Lee statue and related protests and counter protests. 

United Lutheran Seminary expresses deepest sympathy for the those killed and injured in Charlottesville.  Please take a moment to read the written response to the events in Charlottesville. 

We also encourage our listeners to revisit the episode titled “Not waiting for the Hero” to hear an example of a unique form of non-violent counter protest that was carried out 10 years ago under similar circumstances. 

 

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Taking the Long View: Artist Nick Collier and the Raw Charms of a Gettysburg Winter

February 8, 2017

Nick Collier, the current Gettysburg National Military Park Artist-in-Residence, speaks with Katy Giebenhain about sculpture, a contemporary twist on an Afghan Box Camera and what it is like to be a veteran spending a month on the iconic Battlefield outside of tourist season.

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After Custer’s Defeat: The Fate of Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada

January 16, 2017

“They won the battle, but lost the war” summarizes Mr. Hutchinson’s approach to the Battle of the Little Big Horn and the route of Custer’s troops. The U.S. persisted in a relentless military campaign to drive the natives into reservations under their control, while the remnant under Sitting Bull found that the Canadian “Mounties” who were both policemen and magistrates stressed cooperation, provided they observe Canadian law.

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Standing on Hallowed Ground

December 2, 2016

A singer-songwriter from Ohio and a photographer-videographer from Alaska come to Gettysburg via Seattle. Michela Miller-Ferree and George Ferree, the latest artists-in-residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park, have covered lots of territory. They bring a shared sense of adventure and respect for Gettysburg’s history to their month-long residency. They stopped by the Seminary campus for a conversation with Katy Giebenhain from Seminary Ridge Review. Hear Michela perform in a fireside concert at the Visitor Center Saturday, December 10, 2016 at 1:00pm in the Refreshment Saloon. The event is free and open to the public.

Ferreedom Adventure Vlogs

https://ferreedom.wordpress.com/

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Traces: A Gathering Up

June 27, 2016

Sculptor Marlene Alt and Katy Giebenhain from Seminary Ridge Review talk about Alt’s sited sculpture outside the National Park Service Museum and Visitor Center in Gettysburg. “Traces: A Gathering Up” features wax imprints of horse hooves. How do we pay tribute? What is the difference between land and home? How can we imagine the scope of the Battle of Gettysburg? Aside from human casualties there were over 1,000 horses and mules killed here. Alt describes her installation project and her approach to other historical themes in her artwork. She is the May-June 2016 Artist-in-Residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park.


Learn more about Marlene's work.

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