Separating Children to Enforce Immigration Policy

July 6, 2018

Kim Davidson, Director, Center for Public Service, Gettysburg College, recently returned from a study tour of El Paso, TX and Juarez, Mexico maintains that current policy toward Mexican and Central American immigrants is based on racism, and that it is made more acute by the lack of transparency in the practices of I.C.E. (Immigration and Customs Enforcement). She suggests several things that advocates can do, including making their voices heard and providing legal services to those wrongly detained.

 

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Access to Medicines and Overcoming the Barriers

March 26, 2018

In a conversation with Fran Quigley the Seminary Explores learns of some deeply-held misconceptions we have about drug costs, the urgency for change, and how people of faith might fit in. Quigley is Clinical Professor and Director of the Health and Human Rights Clinic at Indiana University McKinney School of Law. He is the author of four books: Prescription for the People: An Activist’s Guide to Making Medicine Affordable for All, If We Can Win Here, How Human Rights Can Build Haiti, and Walking Together, Walking Far.

 

People of Faith for Access to Medicines

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Why a National Health Program Makes Sense to a Family Physician

September 25, 2017

Dr. Dwight Michael, physician in family practice with Gettysburg Family Practice and member of Physicians for a National Health Program and Health Care for All Pennsylvania, believes that healthcare is a human right, recognized as such by every modern industrialized nation except the United States. Opponents have not considered the savings that a single-payer system would bring to the economy; on the contrary, he asserts, the cost of not adopting universal health care will be counted in the trillions by 2020.

Please note this discussion was recorded on July 7, 2017, references to specific bills in Congress should understood in this context.

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Refugees and Migrants: The Duty to Welcome

August 14, 2017

Lou Charest, Manager for University Engagement for Catholic Relief Services, describes the current global refugee crisis and explains why Catholic social teaching, as well as Pope Francis, calls us to welcome migrants and refugees. He offers suggestions for how local communities can provide support, from encouraging legislation to linking with refugee families.

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Here We Stand: Responding to a History of Oppression in S.W. Africa and Congo

July 18, 2017

Dr. Maria Erling, Professor of American Church History, ULS, and author, “The Augustana Story” sets the Lutheran World Federation Assembly, held in Windhoek, Namibia in the context of justice and reconciliation in Namibia and the abused women in the Congo.

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Not Waiting for the Hero

June 19, 2017

Award-winning songwriter, performer, author and peace activist David LaMotte has travelled extensively. In Gettysburg for the first time, he talks with Katy Giebenhain from Seminary Ridge Review about change narratives, reconciliation and a wonderfully unexpected story of nonviolent response.

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Unfolding Stories

June 5, 2017

Writer, scholar and social justice advocate Nancy Cook describes her research and her residency experience at the Gettysburg National Military Park in this episode of The Seminary Explores. Cook holds an M.F.A. from American University and a J.D. from Georgetown University. She has done projects in very interesting settings, including a former state mental hospital in Minnesota.

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