The Seminary Explores
Reconciling in Christ, the Purpose and the Process

Reconciling in Christ, the Purpose and the Process

February 2, 2015

Shirley Armstrong, Psychological Counselor and Peer Education Advisor at Gettysburg College describes the goals of The Reconciling in Christ (RIC) Program is for congregations, synods, colleges, seminaries, and other Lutheran organizations. RIC recognizes Lutheran communities that publicly welcome lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender believers.  She discusses the need for churches to make a statement on the subject, but stresses that the main objective is to get people talking with each other, not simply taking votes.

Parish Ministry in this Time of Change

Parish Ministry in this Time of Change

January 19, 2015

Pastor Brown discussed her week as Minister-in-Residence at Gettysburg Seminary with Dr. Strobert. She describes her conversations with students, preaching and presiding in chapel as well as attending and lecturing in seminary classes. Pastor Brown also discussed her context of parish ministry at Advent Lutheran Church in New York City. It has an immigrant population in addition to being in a gentrified neighborhood. Although a small congregation, the church is involved in broad social outreach in the community.

Martin Luther and the Jews

Martin Luther and the Jews

September 29, 2014
Dr. Strobert interviews Dr. Brooks Schramm (Kraft Professor of Biblical Studies)and Dr. Kirsi Stjerna (Professor of Reformation Church History) at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg and co-authors of Martin Luther, the Bible, and the Jewish People: A Reader about Martin Luther and his perspective on the Jewish people.  Highlights of this discussion include:
1. Martin Luther’s perspective on the Jews comes from his scholarly work as a professor of Old Testament.
2. The social context of the Jews as a people of 'fragile communities' must be considered in discussions.
3. Martin Luther never personally encountered a Jewish person.
4. The importance of the printed word was an important component in publicizing Luther’s unique views on Jews.