The Seminary Explores
Quite a Start: YWCA’s Executive Director Dotty Dalphon

Quite a Start: YWCA’s Executive Director Dotty Dalphon

July 13, 2020

The YWCA in Gettysburg has a special relationship to United Lutheran Seminary. Its main facility has been located on the grounds of the Seminary’s Gettysburg campus since 1981.Gretchen Stuempfle and The Rev. Herman Stuempfle, Jr. (then president of the Seminary) proposed the site in the late 1970’s when the nonprofit was looking to expand. Two faculty members currently serve on its board of directors.

Just before the July 4th weekend The Seminary Explores caught up with the newest Executive Director of the YWCA Gettysburg & Adams County. Dotty Dalphon has her first year behind her, and what a year it has been! Leading a nonprofit with the broad scope of this particular YWCA’s offerings through a pandemic outbreak and a household move across state lines have made for a whirlwind of a welcome to Adams County. She’s pictured here with her daughter who completed her first half-marathon in Gettysburg.

Blackbirding: A Song Cycle After All Your Senses

Blackbirding: A Song Cycle After All Your Senses

April 20, 2020

Award-winning vocalist, writer and multi-genre performing artist Queen Esther joins Katy Giebenhain for a conversation about her developing one person show and what’s been visible and not visible in her first impressions of Gettysburg. A winter artist-in-residence at the Gettysburg National Military Park, Queen Esther is based in New York City. Jazz, Blues, Black Americana, alt-rock, swing, gospel and beyond – these are the musical waters she swims in. Among her extensive collaborations is the avant-blues duo Hoosegow she formed with guitarist Elliott Sharp. Blues Matters Magazine calls her “… modern, yet not flashy while holding true to herself with firmness and a forthright approach and style.”

Many thanks to our host site for this interview, Waldo’s and Co. on the Square in Gettysburg.  The Artist-in-Residence program is made possible by the Gettysburg Foundation and The National Park Arts Foundation, with support from the National Park Service.

Special thanks also to The Seminary Ridge Museum.

 

Investigating Afro-Germans and Afro-Russians

Investigating Afro-Germans and Afro-Russians

October 21, 2019

Dr. Susann Samples, Professor of Foreign Languages at Mt. St. Mary’s University, discusses her Delaplaine Seminar professorship at Mount St. Mary’s University. The professorship’s faculty seminar centered on “The Black Diaspora in Europe” with the goal of introducing this topic to a wider audience and to begin the process of “decolonizing” the curriculum.

In this conversation she explores the historical background and readings relevant to the study of the African Diaspora in Europe. She also discusses the importance of the seminar for a Catholic University and the desired outcomes of the seminar.

The United Nations: Working for Peace in Ways We Might Not Know About

The United Nations: Working for Peace in Ways We Might Not Know About

January 14, 2019

Maarten Halff, Senior Political Affairs Officer, Electoral Assistance Division, United Nations, New York City, describes the large number of requests from client nations for technical assistance in conducting elections, especially in emerging democracies. The UN neither observes nor evaluates the results.  It works with local officials to encourage people to vote, establish voting procedures, and count the votes. Human rights are an important consideration in these consultations.

Presidential elections in the Central African Republic, Feb. 2016. UN Photo/Nektarios Markogiannis
Presidential elections in the Central African Republic, Feb. 2016. UN Photo/Nektarios Markogiannis

The Other Story of Gettysburg: The Underground Railroad and the African American Experience

The Other Story of Gettysburg: The Underground Railroad and the African American Experience

August 13, 2018

In this episode Dr. Scott Hancock discusses the work of the historian. In particular he talks about his research interest in the African American experience and the Underground Railroad. While it is part of the 19th century, the underground railroad continues in our times with people crossing borders, human trafficking, etc. In addition, he discussed the state monuments on the battlefield and what they are teaching and saying to onlookers.

Separating Children to Enforce Immigration Policy

Separating Children to Enforce Immigration Policy

July 6, 2018

Kim Davidson, Director, Center for Public Service, Gettysburg College, recently returned from a study tour of El Paso, TX and Juarez, Mexico maintains that current policy toward Mexican and Central American immigrants is based on racism, and that it is made more acute by the lack of transparency in the practices of I.C.E. (Immigration and Customs Enforcement). She suggests several things that advocates can do, including making their voices heard and providing legal services to those wrongly detained.

 

Additional Resources:

 

Gerrymandering: How to Skew Election Results Without Hardly Trying

Gerrymandering: How to Skew Election Results Without Hardly Trying

December 4, 2017

Often one party receives more votes for congress or the legislature and ends up with fewer representatives. The reason is “gerrymandering”: shaping voting districts to favor one party or the other. Steven Niebler, Coordinator, Fair Districts, Adams County, a Sub-group of Fair Districts, Pennsylvania,  argues that the key to this unbalance is that elected officials choose their own voters. “Fair Districts,” a non-partisan advocacy group, proposes an eleven-member commission, chosen partly at random and partly by serious vetting, to set impartial boundaries.

Pittsburgh and Paris: Why Are Persons of Color Attracted to the City of Light?

Pittsburgh and Paris: Why Are Persons of Color Attracted to the City of Light?

July 3, 2017

Dr. Nelson Strobert, Professor Emeritus of Christian Education, Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary, and author, Daniel Alexander Payne, distinguishes between a tourist and a traveler, and cites three travelers of color who journeyed to Paris to round out their education, and discovered “liberty, equality, and fraternity” as they had not in America.

Black Lives Matter?

Black Lives Matter?

November 21, 2016
Dr. Strobert sits down with Dr. Richard Stewart, retired Associate Professor of Church Administration and Practical Theology, Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia and Dr. Joseph Donnella, Chaplain of the College and adjunct Professor of Religious Studies, Gettysburg College to discuss the Black Lives Matter movement.

This wide ranging discussion explores the realities of being a member of a minority in the United States. Some topics covered include how people of color (even retired pastors) are often perceived as a threat; living a life in tension; ambivalence vs. practicality; theology beyond traditions; laws may be passed but they don’t change attitudes; and the lessons that Black parents must teach their son’s when encountering police. 
American Elections: Why Have We Become so Divided?

American Elections: Why Have We Become so Divided?

August 8, 2016

Dr. Kenneth Mott, Professor of Political Science at Gettysburg College explains that beginning with the nomination of Senator Barry Goldwater in 1964 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act shortly thereafter, the two parties have moved away from the “middle” and toward the “more purified” or ideological.  The reasons are complex but are mainly due to regionalism and segregation, as well as social media and an emphasis on individualism.

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